10 fun facts about Mark Zuckerberg

10 fun facts about Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg - CNN.comvar cnnCurrTime=new Date(1368774301000),cnnCurrHour=3,cnnCurrMin=5,cnnCurrDay="Fri",cnnIsIntl=true,clickID=212106,cnn_cvpAdpre="edition.",cnnCVPAdSectionT1="edition.cnn.com_technology_t1",cnnCVPAdSectionInPage="edition.cnn.com_technology_inpage",cnnShareUrl="%2F2013%2F05%2F14%2Ftech%2Fsocial-media%2Fmark-zuckerberg-birthday%2Findex.html",cnnShareTitle="10%20fun%20facts%20about%20Facebook\'s%20Mark%20Zuckerberg",cnnShareDesc="",cnnFirstPub=new Date('Tuesday May 14 01:15:47 EDT 2013'),cnnSectionName="tech",sectionName="tech",cnnSubSectionName="tch : news",cnnPageType="Story",cnnBrandingValue="default";cnnPartnerValue="";cnnOmniBranding="",cnnAuthor="Brandon Griggs, CNN",disqus_category_id=207582,disqus_identifier="/2013/05/14/tech/social-media/mark-zuckerberg-birthday/index.html",disqus_title="10 fun facts about Facebook\'s Mark Zuckerberg",cnn_edtnswtchver="edition",cnnIsStoryPage=true,cnn_metadata = {},cnn_shareconfig = [];cnn_metadata = {section: ["tech","tch : news"],friendly_name: "10 fun facts about Facebook\'s Mark Zuckerberg",template_type: "content",template_type_content: "gallery",business: {cnn: {page: {author: "Brandon Griggs, CNN",broadcast_franchise: "",video_embed_count: "2",publish_date: "2013/05/14",photo_gallery: "10 fun facts about Facebook\'s Mark Zuckerberg"},video: {video_player: ""}}},user: {authenticated: "",segment: {age: "",zip: "",gender: ""}}};if (typeof(cnnOmniPartner) !== "undefined") {if (cnn_metadata.template_type_content === "") {cnn_metadata.template_type_content = "partner";}}var photo_gallery = "10 fun facts about Facebook\'s Mark Zuckerberg";if(typeof CNN==='undefined'){var CNN=Class.create();}CNN.expandableMap=[''];function _loginOptions(){};var disqus_url=(typeof disqus_identifier!=='undefined') ? 'http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/14/tech/social-media/mark-zuckerberg-birthday/index.html' : 'http://www.cnn.com'+location.pathname;cnnad_newTileIDGroup(['970x66_top','300x250_rgt','300x250_rgt2','336x280_rgt','336x850_rgt','300x150_rgt','728x90_top','728x90_bot','BG_Skin','120x90_bot1','120x90_bot2','120x90_bot3']);cnnad_newTileIDGroup(['607x95_adlinks','336x280_adlinks']);Skip to main content CNN EDITION:  INTERNATIONAL U.S. MÉXICO ARABIC TV:   CNNi CNN en Español Set edition preference Sign up Log in Home Video World U.S. Africa Asia Europe Latin America Middle East Business World Sport Entertainment Tech Travel iReport SHARE THISPrintEmailMore sharingRedditStumbleUponDelicious/* push in config for this share instance */cnn_shareconfig.push({"id" : "cnn_sharebar1","url" : "http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/14/tech/social-media/mark-zuckerberg-birthday/index.html","title" : "10 fun facts about Facebook\'s Mark Zuckerberg"});10 fun facts about Facebook's Mark ZuckerbergBrandon Griggs, CNNBy Brandon Griggs, CNNMay 16, 2013 -- Updated 2105 GMT (0505 HKT) | Filed under: Social Mediaif (typeof cnnArticleGallery=="undefined"){var cnnArticleGallery={};if(typeof cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList=="undefined"){cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList=[];}}var expGalleryPT00=new ArticleExpandableGallery();expGalleryPT00.setImageCount(16);expGalleryPT00.setAdsRefreshCount(3);//cnn_adbptrackpgalimg("Someone buy this man some clothes", 1);.cnn_html_slideshow_metadata > .cnn_html_media_utility::before{color:red;content:'>>';font-size:9px;line-height:12px;padding-right:1px}.cnnstrylccimg640{margin:0 27px 14px 0}.captionText{filter:alpha(opacity=100);opacity:1}.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a,.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a:visited,.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a:link,.captionText a,.captionText a:visited,.captiontext a:link{color:#004276;outline:medium none}.cnnVerticalGalleryPhoto{margin:0 auto;padding-right:68px;width:270px}Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg turns 29 on Tuesday. What do you buy a billionaire for his birthday? May we suggest some new clothes? As this gallery demonstrates, the young tech titan is famously known for his limited (some might say monotonous) wardrobe.Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg turns 29 on Tuesday. What do you buy a billionaire for his birthday? May we suggest some new clothes? As this gallery demonstrates, the young tech titan is famously known for his limited (some might say monotonous) wardrobe.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":true,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":1,"title":"Someone buy this man some clothes"}As a baby, little Mark had to wear whatever his parents dressed him in -- thus this powder blue outfit. He's been striking a blow for personal fashion freedom ever since.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":2,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}Zuckerberg is best-known for his iconic hoodie, which even has its own mock Twitter accounts. But that may not be the most favored item in his closet.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":3,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}Zuckerberg has become partial to this gray Facebook T-shirt, adorned with three small icons that grace every user's Facebook page. cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":4,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}Mark has worn the shirt for numerous Facebook events and announcements, like this one.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":5,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}And this one.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":6,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}And this one.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":7,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}And this one.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":8,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}He wore it in this promotional video ahead of the company's IPO in May 2012.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":9,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}He wore it here.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":10,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}And here. Let's hope he owns more than one.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":11,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}Even Zuckerberg looks a little bored with his T-shirt in this photo.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":12,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}Zuckerberg did clean up his act when President Barack Obama visited Facebook headquarters in April 2011. His suit and tie were so rare, Obama even made a joke about it.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":13,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}But when Facebook went public on May 18, 2012, Zuckerberg was back to his hoodie-wearing ways.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":14,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}No doubt to her great relief, Zuckerberg dressed up for his wedding to longtime girlfriend Priscilla Chan on May 19, 2012. No word on whether he rented the suit.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":15,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}Zuckerberg faces many questions as he ponders his fashion future. Can a tech CEO still wear T-shirts and hoodies to business events at 40? 50? Probably. But let's hope Priscilla took him shopping for his birthday.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":16,"title":"Mark Zuckerberg, fashion icon"}HIDE CAPTIONSomeone buy this man some clothesMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion iconMark Zuckerberg, fashion icon<<<12345678910111213141516>>>Event.observe(window,'load',function(){if(typeof(cnn_adbptrackpgalimg) == 'function' && typeof(cnnArticleGallery) != 'undefined'){cnn_adbptrackpgalimg(cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[0].image,"10 fun facts about Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg");}});STORY HIGHLIGHTSFacebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg turned 29 on May 14Young billionaire has inspired one of every seven people on the planet to use his productZuckerberg trivia: Facebook is mostly blue because he is colorblindEditor's note: Brandon Griggs is CNN.com's tech editor. Follow him on Twitter.

(CNN) -- Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg just had a birthday on May 14. He's now 29. If that seems insanely young for a billionaire, remember that he co-founded Facebook when he was a teenager.

Zuckerberg has a lot to celebrate. He's amassed a fortune, inspired one of every seven people on the planet to use his product and changed how the world communicates -- all before age 30.

By comparison, when they were 29, Steve Jobs launched the Macintosh computer and Bill Gates was readying the first retail version of Microsoft Windows. And most of the rest of us were just struggling to pay the rent.

So happy birthday to Zuck! To mark the occasion, we collected these 10 random facts about the tech wunderkind:

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2. AOL and Microsoft tried to recruit him when he was in high school after he created Synapse, a program that used artificial intelligence to learn users' music-listening habits.

3. He wears the same gray Facebook T-shirt almost every day because he's busy and it saves him time in the morning.

4. Despite Zuckerberg's casual wardrobe, he said he wore a tie every day in 2009 to show that Facebook was serious about growing in the face of the global recession.

5. He is a vegetarian and once said he will only eat meat if he has killed the animal himself. But among his "likes" on his Facebook page are McDonald's and In-N-Out Burger.

6. He has amassed 220,000 Twitter followers despite the fact that he's only tweeted 19 times in four years, and not once in 15 months.

7. In October 2010, Zuckerberg took a bunch of Facebook staffers to a public theater to see "The Social Network," the movie about the founding of Facebook. In public comments afterward, he criticized the film's portrayal of him as someone who invented Facebook to gain social status.

8. He owns a Hungarian sheepdog named Beast, who has a Facebook page with 1.5 million fans.

9. He took some heat last year for giving his wife, Priscilla Chan, a ruby wedding ring that jewelers valued at about $25,000 even though he was worth about $19 billion at the time.

10. If you type @[4:0] in a Facebook comment window and hit enter, his name will appear.

What, if anything, fascinates you about Zuckerberg? Let us know in the comments.

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Gamma-ray burst riddle

An X-ray telescope image of GRB130427A.An X-ray telescope image of GRB130427A.On April 27, NASA satellites detected massive gamma-ray burst, strongest in decadesMeg Urry says the event sent jets of charged particles in Earth's directionShe says it likely was the collapse of a huge star into a black holeUrry: The event was a lucky one for astronomers who will now have much to analyzeEditor's note: Meg Urry is the Israel Munson professor of physics and astronomy and chairwoman of the department of physics at Yale University, where she is the director of the Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics

(CNN) -- On April 27, NASA's Fermi and Swift satellites detected a strong signal from the brightest gamma-ray burst in decades. Because this was relatively close, it was thousands of times brighter than the typical gamma-ray bursts that are seen by Swift every few days. Scientists are now scrambling to learn more.

We already knew that when the biggest stars run out of fuel, they don't fade quietly away. Instead, they explode in a blaze of glory known as a supernova. These stellar explosions are often bright enough to be seen by us even though they are in galaxies billions of light-years from our own Milky Way galaxy home.

In very rare cases -- such as GRB130427A (tagged with the date of its discovery) -- astrophysicists are lucky enough to see energetic gamma-rays from hyperfast jets of outflowing material consisting of charged particles created during a massive star's violent death throes.

Meg Urry This means GRB130427A's jets must be aimed toward Earth -- purely by chance, of course. For every jet pointed at us, there are hundreds of exploding stars across the universe whose jets point randomly in other directions. Telescopes on other planets in those directions could see those jets, and we might see the exploding stars as supernovae, but we don't see the bright gamma-ray flashes from jets beamed away from us.

In the hours after this unusual gamma-ray burst was discovered, astrophysicists rushed to learn more.

Thanks to observations made with the Gemini ground-based optical telescope in Hawaii, it quickly became clear that GRB130427A was superbright primarily because it lay only a few billion light years away. Had it been situated in a much more distant galaxy -- as many gamma-ray bursts are -- its signal would have been relatively feeble.

The proximity of GRB130427A means we can learn a great deal about it.

For example, most of the energy from supernovae is thought to be carried away by neutrinos -- the lightweight, difficult-to-detect particles that are so important to understanding the fundamental laws of nature.

The world's most powerful neutrino telescope, IceCube, uses Antarctic ice as the detector volume, with electronic equipment sunk throughout a cubic kilometer of ice -- enough water to fill a million swimming pools -- to detect signals from neutrinos interacting with the ice.

If there is a supernova associated with this gamma-ray burst, a big optical flash should be seen any day now by ground-based telescopes, preceded by a flood of neutrinos. (The neutrinos are emitted at the time of collapse, while the optical light is the consequence of explosive debris hitting material surrounding the star a bit later.)

Interestingly, an April 18 paper in the journal Nature reported that upper limits for neutrinos measured from IceCube are low enough that gamma-ray bursts are unlikely to be the sole source of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Just nine days later, the bright nearby burst happened, leading to the Fermi detection of the highest energy gamma-ray ever.

Now there is a real chance IceCube will make the first detection of astrophysical neutrinos, from the supernova associated with GRB130427A.

Want to know more technical details? Here is some background information about light and about the deaths of stars:

Gamma-rays are the most energetic form of light, with wavelengths far shorter than ordinary optical light (the light your eye can see), or even ultraviolet or X-ray light.

The energy of a packet of light -- or "photon" -- is inversely proportional to its wavelength. Since the wavelength of an X-ray photon is approximately 1/1,000 of the wavelength of optical light, for example, an X-ray photon has 1,000 times the energy of an optical photon. This is why X-rays can penetrate your skin and soft tissue -- though not bone -- while sunlight mostly reflects off your skin.

Gamma-rays have thousands to millions or even billions of times the energy of ordinary sunlight. Being highly energetic, they are hard to produce and very rare. So when we detect gamma-rays from space, we know they signal intensely hot, extreme events.

Stars, such as our sun, are giant balls of gas held together by gravity. Acting alone, gravity would cause stars to collapse completely, but as long as energy is produced at their centers by nuclear fusion (the joining of atomic nuclei to form new elements, as in a hydrogen bomb), the star is heated and puffed up. During this phase, stars radiate that heat, shining brightly like our sun, mostly at optical wavelengths.

It is an interesting triple "coincidence," which probably evolved over time, that our eyes are most sensitive to yellow-green light, which happens to be the characteristic color of sunlight as well as the color that can most easily be transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere.

When nuclear fusion uses up a star's fuel, in the central high-pressure stellar core where fusion occurs, the star will collapse fairly violently. Depending on its initial mass, it might collapse to a compact hot star known as a white dwarf (when the star's mass is less than 1.4 times the mass of our sun) or to a neutron star (for stars 1.4 to about three times the mass of our sun) or to a black hole (for stars more massive than three times the mass of our sun).

A black hole collapse is very violent and not well understood at present. Theorists believe the rapid collapse generates heat that ignites the explosion. The explosive energy is released in the form of neutrinos, light (mostly gamma-rays), and a pair of relativistically outflowing emitting jets.

That's why an event such as GRB130427A probably signals the collapse of a massive star into a black hole.

Every single atom of your body that is not hydrogen or helium was created in the fiery interior of a massive star.
Meg UrryIncidentally, if not for supernovae, we wouldn't be here.

Every single atom of your body that is not hydrogen or helium was created in the fiery interior of a massive star. The supernova explosion disperses these elements throughout interstellar space, where they become the building material for new planets. When Earth formed out of such materials -- iron, manganese, calcium, silicon, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, etc. -- organic chemicals, then cells, then organisms, then humans were able to evolve.

In the 1960s, NASA launched the first gamma-ray satellites to look for signals of intense radioactive decay on Earth, which could be generated by nuclear explosions. In other words, detecting gamma-rays was a way to spot nuclear tests.

Years later, scientists examining data from the Vela satellites found gamma-ray bursts -- but they were coming from space, not from human activities on the ground. Since that time, gamma-ray bursts have been one of the most interesting phenomena in the cosmos. They are incredibly luminous, with most of the energy of a stellar explosion packed into a few seconds or less, so they represent a kind of extreme physics.

Thousands of gamma-ray bursts have been studied for more than 40 years. Because of its proximity, GRB130427A generated more gamma-rays, over a longer time and at higher energies, than any detected previously by the Fermi or Swift satellites.

Astrophysicists can't be successful just because they are clever and hard-working. They also have to be lucky.

On April 27, nature smiled on the Earth's astrophysical community in the form of GRB130427A, a powerful laboratory for understanding relativistic jets, black holes and stellar collapse. Now the experimental analysis begins.

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook/CNNOpinion.

More space and science news at CNN Light Years

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Meg Urry.

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Meet the real Robocop

Ex-cop builds robot to 'snatch kids back from abyss' - CNN.comvar cnnCurrTime=new Date(1368774386000),cnnCurrHour=3,cnnCurrMin=6,cnnCurrDay="Fri",cnnIsIntl=true,clickID=212106,cnn_cvpAdpre="edition.",cnnCVPAdSectionT1="edition.cnn.com_specialreports_makecreateinnovate_t1",cnnCVPAdSectionInPage="edition.cnn.com_specialreports_makecreateinnovate_inpage",cnnShareUrl="%2F2013%2F05%2F09%2Ftech%2Finnovation%2Frobot-humanoid-baltimore-robocop%2Findex.html",cnnShareTitle="The%20real%20Robocop%3A%20Ex-policeman%20builds%20robot%20from%20household%20goods",cnnShareDesc="",cnnFirstPub=new Date('Thursday May 9 08:17:27 EDT 2013'),cnnSectionName="tech",sectionName="tech",cnnSubSectionName="tch : news",cnnPageType="Story",cnnBrandingValue="intl.make.create.innovate";cnnPartnerValue="";cnnOmniBranding="Make Create Innovate",cnnAuthor="Matthew Knight, CNN",disqus_category_id=207582,disqus_identifier="/2013/05/09/tech/innovation/robot-humanoid-baltimore-robocop/index.html",disqus_title="The real Robocop: Ex-policeman builds robot from household goods",cnn_edtnswtchver="edition",cnnIsStoryPage=true,cnn_metadata = {},cnn_shareconfig = [];cnn_metadata = {section: ["tech","tch : news"],friendly_name: "The real Robocop: Ex-policeman builds robot from household goods",template_type: "content",template_type_content: "gallery",business: {cnn: {page: {author: "Matthew Knight, CNN",broadcast_franchise: "",video_embed_count: "0",publish_date: "2013/05/09",photo_gallery: "The real Robocop: Ex-policeman builds robot from household goods"},video: {video_player: ""}}},user: {authenticated: "",segment: {age: "",zip: "",gender: ""}}};if (typeof(cnnOmniPartner) !== "undefined") {if (cnn_metadata.template_type_content === "") {cnn_metadata.template_type_content = "partner";}}var photo_gallery = "The real Robocop: Ex-policeman builds robot from household goods";if(typeof CNN==='undefined'){var CNN=Class.create();}CNN.expandableMap=[''];function _loginOptions(){};var disqus_url=(typeof disqus_identifier!=='undefined') ? 'http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/09/tech/innovation/robot-humanoid-baltimore-robocop/index.html' : 'http://www.cnn.com'+location.pathname;cnnad_newTileIDGroup(['970x66_top','300x250_rgt','300x250_rgt2','336x280_rgt','336x850_rgt','300x150_rgt','728x90_top','728x90_bot','BG_Skin','120x90_bot1','120x90_bot2','120x90_bot3']);cnnad_newTileIDGroup(['607x95_adlinks','336x280_adlinks']);Skip to main content CNN EDITION:  INTERNATIONAL U.S. MÉXICO ARABIC TV:   CNNi CNN en Español Set edition preference Sign up Log in Home Video World U.S. Africa Asia Europe Latin America Middle East Business World Sport Entertainment Tech Travel iReport /* STORY PAGE SPECIFIC CSS */.cnn_stryspccvrgehdr { background:#fff url('http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.e/img/3.0/mosaic/bg_speccov_hdr.gif') 0px 0px repeat-x; }.cnn_stryspcvh1 { position:relative; height:74px;background:transparent url('http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/ssi/story/3.0/banner/intl.make.create.innovate.inc/make.create.innovate.jpg') 50% 0px no-repeat;overflow:hidden; }.cnn_stryspcvh2 { font:bold 10px/12px arial;color:#666;padding:0 0 2px 0; }.cnn_stryspcvh3 { font-family:arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-weight:bold; font-size:18px; line-height:21px; }.cnn_stryspcvh4 { position:absolute; z-index:1000; float:left;margin:30px 0 0 10px;display:inline; }.cnn_stryspcvh5 { float:right;margin:30px 10px 0 0;display:inline;text-align:right; }.cnn_stryspcvh20 { padding:0 0 2px 0; }.cnn_stryspccvrgebot { height:3px; background:#e6e6e6; }.cnn_stryspccvh6 { width:100%; height:74px; text-align:center; left:0; }.cnn_stryspccvh6 a { display:block; margin:0 auto; width:304px; height:74px; }Part of complete coverage onMake, Create, InnovateSHARE THISPrintEmailMore sharingRedditStumbleUponDelicious/* push in config for this share instance */cnn_shareconfig.push({"id" : "cnn_sharebar1","url" : "http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/09/tech/innovation/robot-humanoid-baltimore-robocop/index.html","title" : "The real Robocop: Ex-policeman builds robot from household goods"});The real Robocop: Ex-policeman builds robot from household goodsBy Matthew Knight, CNNMay 10, 2013 -- Updated 1123 GMT (1923 HKT) | Filed under: Innovationsif (typeof cnnArticleGallery=="undefined"){var cnnArticleGallery={};if(typeof cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList=="undefined"){cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList=[];}}var expGalleryPT00=new ArticleExpandableGallery();expGalleryPT00.setImageCount(8);expGalleryPT00.setAdsRefreshCount(3);//cnn_adbptrackpgalimg("HEX: The homemade humanoid robot", 1);.cnn_html_slideshow_metadata > .cnn_html_media_utility::before{color:red;content:'>>';font-size:9px;line-height:12px;padding-right:1px}.cnnstrylccimg640{margin:0 27px 14px 0}.captionText{filter:alpha(opacity=100);opacity:1}.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a,.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a:visited,.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a:link,.captionText a,.captionText a:visited,.captiontext a:link{color:#004276;outline:medium none}.cnnVerticalGalleryPhoto{margin:0 auto;padding-right:68px;width:270px}Former Baltimore cop, Mark Haygood and his robot HEX, which he made by recycling electrical equipment. Former Baltimore cop, Mark Haygood and his robot HEX, which he made by recycling electrical equipment. cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":true,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":1,"title":"HEX: The homemade humanoid robot"}HEX is four foot, three inches tall and weighs 50 pounds. Haygood fell in love with robots at a young age. "I grew up very poor in Baltimore and every Christmas my mother used to purchase toy robots for me -- the kind that shuffled across the floor, spun around with lights flashing. I thought they were the most marvelous things on the planet," he says.cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":2,"title":"HEX: The homemade humanoid robot"}His feet are made from cooking trays and his legs were built using hi-fi speakers. cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":3,"title":"HEX: The homemade humanoid robot"}Haygood dismantled fans and power tools to create HEX's arms. He also used a 3D printer to make the hands. cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":4,"title":"HEX: The homemade humanoid robot"}An old clock radio has been hacked to create his head. cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":5,"title":"HEX: The homemade humanoid robot"}The camera situated inside HEX's head will be wired up in the next phase of the project, Haygood says. "I'm trying to build a machine which is inexpensive so that it can be readily available for high-school age kids." cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":6,"title":"HEX: The homemade humanoid robot"}HEXs hands were a combination of the Inmoov open source design and his own artistic expression, says Haygood. cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":7,"title":"HEX: The homemade humanoid robot"}HEX meets "R2-D2" at a recent Robofest event. Haygood hopes to inspire kids in Baltimore to build robots. cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList.length]={"currentPicture":false,"x":0,"y":0,"pos":8,"title":"HEX: The homemade humanoid robot"}HIDE CAPTIONHEX: The homemade humanoid robotHEX: The homemade humanoid robotHEX: The homemade humanoid robotHEX: The homemade humanoid robotHEX: The homemade humanoid robotHEX: The homemade humanoid robotHEX: The homemade humanoid robotHEX: The homemade humanoid robot<<<12345678>>>Event.observe(window,'load',function(){if(typeof(cnn_adbptrackpgalimg) == 'function' && typeof(cnnArticleGallery) != 'undefined'){cnn_adbptrackpgalimg(cnnArticleGallery.currentImageList[0].image,"The real Robocop: Ex-policeman builds robot from household goods");}});STORY HIGHLIGHTSEx-cop builds a humanoid robot called HEX made from electrical appliances The self-taught robot maker spent over two decades in police force in Baltimore Robot weighs 50 pounds and has a clock radio for a head and cooking trays for feetWalking robot can help kids learn about robotics, says Mark Haygood

(CNN) -- Take a pair of hi-fi speakers, an old radio, a couple of DVD players and countless other household appliances, apply some ingenuity and what do you get?

If you're Mark Haygood, an ex-cop turned robot maker, you get HEX -- a four foot, three-inch tall humanoid robot.

"Frankly, I think of it as a very large toy. I think that mindset helped me get the build done, because it's such a daunting task," said Haygood.

Four years in the making, it's been as much art project as engineering feat, he says, requiring the visualization of the various body parts.

"The legs are made from outdoor speakers -- they're gorgeous. His shoulders are made from fans, his forearms from power tools. The chest and back are made from kid's riding toys and his head is a clock radio. I also employed a 3-D printer for the hands, using a combination of the Inmoov open-source design and my own artistic expression," the 49-year-old from Baltimore explains.

Read: How USB turned engineer into 'rock star'

"There are so many diverse parts on the machine that it would take me all day to tell you. It was a really complex build, but I love this machine and I'm anxious to build another."

All the major components used to build HEX were sourced from ex-police officer Mark Haywood's home.Inez Torre/CNNThe self-taught roboticist has drawn inspiration from Honda's ASIMO robot and Drexel University's HUBO as well as sounding out opinion at his local hackerspace.

Assembling HEX has cost the proverbial arm and a leg -- "tens of thousands of dollars," says Haygood -- and is controlled remotely using a Zigbee USB dongle attached to his laptop.

"He can step unsupported, but it's not completely stable -- I have a slight problem with joint compliance at the moment. But his hands are fully functional, his legs are functional and he has 23 degrees of freedom."

It's all a far cry from Haygood's previous life as a police officer -- serving the Baltimore Police Department for over two decades before retiring in 2006.

"I really enjoyed being a cop ... I wanted to go out and lock up the bad guys and that's what I did. But policing completely takes over your life. That's one of the reasons I got out," he says.

The death of his father three years later prompted Haygood to re-evaluate his life and in looking for a new path he turned back to an old passion.

Read: World's first Braille smartphone in development

"I grew up very poor in Baltimore and every Christmas my mother used to purchase toy robots for me -- the kind that shuffled across the floor, spun around with lights flashing. I thought they were the most marvelous things on the planet."

This was trial by fire. I chose the most difficult thing a person could build and I've learned so much that my brain is just brimming now and ready to go
Mark HaygoodNot content playing with them, Haygood would pull them apart and put them back together in differing configurations.

It helped numb the pain of poverty, he says, while also keeping him out of trouble -- a trick he's hoping to pull off for a new generation of kids.

Haygood has already introduced HEX to the robotics club at Baltimore's Dunbar High School and plans future visits to other schools and clubs in the city.

"Because of the crime problems in Baltimore, it's a perfect opportunity to try and snatch some children back from the abyss. That's my objective. It's a really beautiful thing to be able to introduce robotics to kids."

To help spread the message, and the cost, Haygood is launching a Kickstarter campaign. The money raised will be used to iron out flaws as well as document the entire process -- "so anyone can see every nut, bolt and screw," he says.

"It's full speed ahead for me now. This was trial by fire. I chose the most difficult thing a person could build and I've learned so much that my brain is just brimming now and ready to go. I'm excited for the future."

0Comments »SHARE THISPrintEmailMore sharingRedditStumbleUponDelicious/* push in config for this share instance */cnn_shareconfig.push({"id" : "cnn_sharebar2","url" : "http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/09/tech/innovation/robot-humanoid-baltimore-robocop/index.html","title" : "The real Robocop: Ex-policeman builds robot from household goods"});var OB_permalink='http://edition.cnn.com'+location.pathname;var OB_langJS='http://widgets.outbrain.com/lang_en.js';var OB_widgetId='AR_1';var OB_Template="cnnedition";if (typeof(OB_Script)!='undefined'){OutbrainStart();}else{var OB_Script=true;var str="cnnad_createAd("730968","http://ads.cnn.com/html.ng/site=cnn_international&cnn_intl_pagetype=mmst&cnn_intl_position=607x95_adlinks&cnn_intl_rollup=technology&page.allowcompete=no¶ms.styles=fs","95","607");cnnad_registerSpace(730968,607,95);ADVERTISEMENTPart of complete coverage on Make Create Innovate The real Robocop May 10, 2013 -- Updated 1124 GMT (1924 HKT)How did an ex-cop fashion a fully functioning robot from old hi-fi speakers, DVD players and assorted household items?From engineer to tech 'rock star'April 26, 2013 -- Updated 1341 GMT (2141 HKT)More than 10 billion USB sticks are believed to be in use around the world today ensuring co-inventor, Ajay Bhatt, has a place in tech's unofficial hall of fame.Biometric scanner for iPhoneApril 16, 2013 -- Updated 2007 GMT (0407 HKT)The AOptix wrap-around device turns an iPhone 4 or 4S into a portable iris, face, fingerprint and voice scanner.A California tech company has launched a tool that turns a regular iPhone 4 or 4S into a powerful biometrics scanning tool.World's tiniest fisheye cameraApril 12, 2013 -- Updated 1757 GMT (0157 HKT)Inventor Greg Dash holds the world's smallest digital fisheye camera.What's four centimeters long, two centimeters high and smaller than the average thumb? 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CNN's Nick Glass visits the Dutch firm pioneering the effort.Materials that magically healFebruary 22, 2013 -- Updated 1734 GMT (0134 HKT)The notion of self-healing materials might sound a bit "Terminator" -- but the first versions of the technology are destined to hit the market in 2013.The bionic hand with the human touch February 1, 2013 -- Updated 1611 GMT (0011 HKT)CNN's Nick Glass meets David Gow, inventor of the i-limb -- a revolutionary prosthetic hand which is changing lives.Nano-coating offers watertight solutionJanuary 18, 2013 -- Updated 1452 GMT (2252 HKT)British tech firm P2i has developed a "liquid repellent nano-coating" that can be sprayed onto a solid surface and repels nearly all liquids.Fancy a slice of Raspberry Pi?January 8, 2013 -- Updated 1743 GMT (0143 HKT)In a world where computers are increasingly powerful and flashy, the Raspberry Pi offers surprising proof for the virtue of moderation. Liquid air future fuels garage inventor December 7, 2012 -- Updated 2247 GMT (0647 HKT)Watching Peter Dearman at work amid the clutter of his workshop, it's easy to see why one of his sons refers to him as a "nutty professor."The $40 tumbleweed minesweeperNovember 29, 2012 -- Updated 1804 GMT (0204 HKT)An Afghan designer has developed a low-cost, wind-powered, mine-detonating device inspired by the toys he played with as a child. Mind-controlled chopper aids learningNovember 23, 2012 -- Updated 1032 GMT (1832 HKT)A toy helicopter controlled by nothing but brainwaves could be available to the public just in time to hover under this year's Christmas tree. var cnn_oburlStr = location.pathname + '';cnn_oburlStr = (cnn_oburlStr.indexOf('?') > -1) ? cnn_oburlStr.substr(0, cnn_oburlStr.indexOf('?')) : cnn_oburlStr;var OB_permalink= 'http://edition.cnn.com' + cnn_oburlStr;var OB_Template="cnnedition";var OB_widgetId= 'VR_1';var OB_langJS ='http://widgets.outbrain.com/lang_en.js';if ( typeof(OB_Script)!='undefined' ) {OutbrainStart();} else {var OB_Script = true;var str = "var OB_Template="cnnedition";var OB_widgetId= 'SB_2';var OB_langJS ='http://widgets.outbrain.com/lang_en.js';if ( typeof(OB_Script)!='undefined' ) {OutbrainStart();} else {var OB_Script = true;var str = ".OB_SB_1, .OB_SB_2 { padding:0px; }#outbrain_container_1_stripBox .strip-like, #outbrain_container_2_stripBox .strip-like { font-size:18px; }#ob_strip_container_rel_1_stripBox { }#ob_strip_container_rel_1_stripBox .item-container, #ob_strip_container_rel_2_stripBox .item-container { padding-top:8px;border-top:1px solid #E5E5E5; }ADVERTISEMENTcnnad_createAd("625961","http://ads.cnn.com/html.ng/site=cnn_international&cnn_intl_pagetype=mmst&cnn_intl_position=336x280_adlinks&cnn_intl_rollup=technology&page.allowcompete=no¶ms.styles=fs","280","336");cnnad_registerSpace(625961,336,280);

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